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BINX’S STORY

Operation Kindness does not play favorites, however, Binx stole the hearts of OPK’s staff with her rambunctious personality. Binx’s amazing transformation showcased her resilient spirit.

Binx was found by a Good Samaritan. OPK staff discovered Binx was suffering from severely infected eyes. The medical team made the difficult, but necessary, decision to perform the surgery Binx needed to alleviate her pain.

Binx has since healed and now enjoys life with her new family as a playful, spunky kitten - who just happens to be blind!

TIGER LILY’S STORY

Mother’s Day came early for sweet Tiger Lily. She came to Operation Kindness in September of 2019 from Hood County Animal Control, a small rural shelter in Granbury. Tiger Lily was very pregnant and tested positive for heartworm.

On October 7, Tiger Lily gracefully delivered nine puppies in the nursery at OPK. Tiger Lily fulfilled her motherly duties from a foster home. She was in perfect health after being successfully treated for heartworm.

All of her puppies were quickly adopted once old enough, and Tiger Lily, now known as Ginger, was adopted on December 8.

SIENNA’S STORY

The Growing as Parents program at The Family Compass is a fee, home-mentoring, parent education program that provides guidance on building positive parent-child relationships and promotes early development, learning, and healthy children. The program begins with developmental screenings for children and a thorough intake interview followed by weekly parenting education sessions in-home. Parent Educators also connect parents to various resources for additional support.

Sienna, a 20-year-old mother, entered the Growing As Parents program a little over four years ago when her daughter Shilah was two years old.

Sienna’s Parent Educator noticed that Shilah had
developmental delays, so she referred Shilah to Early Childhood Intervention services among other resources to ensure that Shilah remained on track to enter kindergarten when the time came.

With the help of her Parent Educator, Sienna learned that academic success for Shilah was critical for a stable future. Sienna even set academic goals for herself.

Sienna, who dropped out of school to have Shilah, has since graduated high school and now works at the front desk in a small dental office while she takes courses to become a dental hygienist.

When the COVID pandemic hit, Sienna felt increasingly overwhelmed. With Shilah home all day, Sienna felt it was difficult to juggle everything on her plate. The depression that Sienna experienced while pregnant (but subsequently has managed), re-emerged. When Sienna’s boyfriend lost his job, Sienna started to isolate and shut down.

Sienna attempted suicide while staying overnight at a friend’s house, who found Sienna in time and got her to a hospital.

Because of their long-term, trusting relationship,
Sienna’s Parent Educator became a lifeline for her.
Sienna’s Parent Educator helped her recover from the episode and get back on her medication. The two worked together to set small, attainable goals so Sienna could experience success and visualize a path forward.

Sienna has since stabilized. She returned to work and continues to support Shilah. Despite not having many outside resources for the summer, Sienna now has a creative, solid plan in place to navigate the summer months with her daughter and prepare for the school year in the fall.

ZY'COREY'S STORY

Big Thought’s Creative Solutions is an arts-as-workforce intervention program for adjudicated youth, ages 10-17. Creative Solutions uses visual, performing and digital arts to help young people tap into their inherent greatness by improving job skills, promoting a positive self image, and increasing social and emotional development.

Implemented in partnership with Dallas County Juvenile Department, SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts and master teaching artist mentors, Creative Solutions uses an innovative, results-driven model to promote lasting, positive change in the youth served.

Creative Solutions has worked with some 14,000 Dallas youth over 25 years.

In Texas, more than 60 percent of juvenile offenders end up in trouble again within three years of probation or release. For Creative Solutions, the eight-year recidivism rate is just 10 percent - one of the lowest in the state.

Zy’Corey is a Creative Solutions participant at Big Thought.

“In the real world I’m not really accepted, but at Big Thought it’s like a family,” said Zy’Corey. “I feel like I can be myself. And that I can express myself through creative thinking, creative ways. I can dance and act. I can sing. Do poetry. I’ve took dance before, but when I came to Creative Solutions it just brought it out more, because it was like a family.”

“People that have been through the same thing - we’ve all been through the same thing. We’ve all been on probation and everything,” said Zy’Corey. “So I felt more comfortable around them. We could relate.”

In the summer of 2019 Zy’Corey was elevated to Peer Leader. He was also one of the few students who shared his story with Presidents Bush and Clinton during a visit last summer.

Zy’Corey’s latest endeavor is preparing for an original musical production of The Forgotten Voice, which was developed by the Creative Solutions students. The musical centers around the journey teenagers go through to discover themselves and their voice.

“We want the world to see that we can tell [the story], because some of us have been in that situation. We go through high school, we know what happens in high school,” said Zy’Corey.

When asked to describe the program in one word, Zy’Corey said, “Extraordinary!”

ELIZABETH’S STORY

Understanding and navigating the impact of having a developmental delay or disability is often an immense challenge for both the child and their family. Finding the right care can prove even more difficult when bilingual services are required. Fortunately, The Warren Center is amply prepared to help children and families through such challenges.

At eight months old, Elizabeth could not move around much, hold up her head, or focus when looking at faces and toys. Elizabeth’s mother felt very worried and reached out to The Warren Center for help.

The Warren Center acted immediately. Liz, a bilingual occupational therapist, began working with Elizabeth and her mother (who does not speak English). Liz helped Elizabeth through her physical delays and coached her mother on therapeutic techniques to practice at home every day. Liz also helped Elizabeth’s mother navigate numerous other medical issues that surfaced and suggested treatment plans.

Liz referred the family to multiple medical specialists to properly address Elizabeth’s ongoing visual, developmental, and feeding concerns.

Throughout the past two years - filled with many questions, doctors, and numerous medical appointments - Elizabeth’s mother says she relies on Liz as a sounding board. She trusts Liz to calm her fears and help her understand the treatment program.

After two years of services with The Warren Center, Elizabeth can now hold her head up, sit up by herself, and can even take some steps with the help of a gait trainer that Liz helped the family access. Elizabeth can now make vocalizations and sounds, and is eating soft foods. Through coaching via tele-therapy (due to COVID-19), Elizabeth has discovered a new talent: connecting and separating Lego blocks – a demonstration of how far she has come in her fine motor skills.

While the family still does not have an official diagnosis, the medical team is working on it and ruling things out. Elizabeth’s mother is keenly focused on her daughter’s success; learning how she can help her daughter, following through with the therapeutic suggestions given to her, and now using The Warren Center’s tele-therapy program to navigate through medical concerns.


2019 Summary of Grants

A Letter from The President



This Annual Summary is about 2019. Its purpose is to reflect on the work of the Foundation in 2019 and highlight some of the notable projects that we supported in that year.

In recent years, the annual summaries have also included expressions of our faith and calling as a Christian organization with a mission to love and serve God by allowing him to work through us to lift up those around us in meaningful ways. We are continually challenged to evaluate whether that is in fact what we are doing.

So this year, rather than looking only at 2019, we decided to look more carefully at a few of the initiatives we have been pursuing over the last several years that involve animal welfare in Dallas, Texas children in foster care, and clubfoot relief in Africa. What follows will describe these three projects, some of the results we have seen, and our hopes and objectives for the projects as we move forward.

In addition, we include in the section, A Look Forward, an even broader statement of objectives we adopted in 2019 to help guide our work into the future.

Now, of course, notions of “moving forward” and looking “into the future” are shrouded by the events of 2020. The COVID-19 pandemic and the movement for racial and social justice present new filters through which we must look at all of our work, so we are mindful of the need to hold our objectives loosely as we proceed.

In 2020, we have moved to address critical needs presented by these events and we will have more to say about those efforts in our 2020 Annual Summary.

For now, suffice to say we are listening, learning and trying to remain open to see the paths God is preparing for us to follow. We are confident in our mission and trust in our Lord but we are also challenged to evaluate the means we have been using to accomplish our objectives.

As the clouds part and our vision is sharpened, we resolve to adapt our means as needed to further the causes we know to be true; children need to be protected from abuse and neglect, children diagnosed with physical and mental disabilities need care and treatment, inequities in opportunities available to children living in lower income neighborhoods need to be addressed, and justice needs to be pursued. We will continue to advance these causes as we look for ever more effective ways to achieve these goals.






Thornton Hardie, Foundation President
$34.7M

awarded

168

grants

157

organizations

$38.6M

paid

An overview

$31.9M

awarded

186

grants

180

organizations

18,000

people served

what we fund



The Foundation works to defend the welfare of children suffering from abuse or neglect, afford relief to those facing mental health challenges, provide youth with opportunities for enrichment and character development, encourage healthy families and communities, enhance the quality of life of children, youth, and families with disabilities, and promote the humane treatment of companion animals.

Animal Welfare

Child Welfare

Child & Youth Experiences

Disability Services

International

Mental Health

Animal Welfare


the goal

To promote ethical and humane treatment of companion animals.

Funding Priorities

  • Reduce animal cruelty
  • Decrease number of stray animals
  • Make Dallas a no-kill community


4

grants awarded in 2019


$3,150,000

dollars awarded in 2019


Child Welfare


the goal

To alleviate conditions that are harmful to families or place children at risk.

Funding Priorities

  • Increase access to home visiting programs
  • Support community-based care
  • Increase access to integrated healthcare for foster youth


17

grants awarded in 2019


$3,150,000

dollars awarded in 2019


Child & Youth Experiences


the goal

To support Christian discipleship, cultivate character, and provide opportunities.

Funding Priorities

  • Increase Christian and adaptive camperships
  • Increase Christian and adaptive after-school placements
  • Increase Christian and adaptive enrichment experiences


50

grants awarded in 2019


$2,234,500

dollars awarded in 2019


Disability Services


the goal

To support youth adversely affected by disabilities.

Funding Priorities

  • Increase access to ECI programs
  • Increase access to specialty care, education and opportunities
  • Increase animal-assisted therapy


30

grants awarded in 2019


$7,544,500

dollars awarded in 2019


International


the goal

To serve youth with disabilities and families with programs that meet their basic needs.

Funding Priorities

  • Work toward eliminating human trafficking in India
  • Increase access to water in developing countries
  • Increase access to services for youth with disabilities


12

grants awarded in 2019


$7,509,600

dollars awarded in 2019


Mental Health


the goal

To expand access to mental health services for children and youth.

Funding Priorities

  • Increase on-site screenings in schools
  • Increase access to therapeutic mental health services
  • Increase the availability of rehabilitation services


12

grants awarded in 2019


$5,015,000

dollars awarded in 2019


The Foundation also supports organizations who focus on the following areas: Community Benefit, Early Childhood Development, Education, Global Christianity, Healthy Families & Communities, and Homelessness.
Impact stories

ANIMAL WELFARE

OPERATION KINDNESS


The mission of Operation Kindness is to care for homeless cats and dogs in a no-kill environment until each is adopted into responsible homes and to advocate humane values and behavior.

Founded in 1976, Operation Kindness is a pioneer in North Texas for providing assistance to animals in need of medical care, companionship, and most of all, a home. More than a shelter, Operation Kindness is a safe haven for homeless pets in need of a second chance to find a loving family. Operation Kindness believes in going above and beyond to give every animal the care and kindness they deserve. Operation Kindness assists approximately 5,000 dogs and cats each year, caring for an average of 400 animals per day.

BINX’S STORY


TIGER LILY’S STORY


CHILD WELFARE

THE FAMILY COMPASS


The mission of Family Compass is to build healthy families and a strong North Texas community by preventing child abuse and neglect.

Family Compass enters the lives of vulnerable children at-risk for abuse, and provides their parents with one-on-one education, encouragement, support, and tools to aid them in becoming stronger, healthier families. Its child abuse prevention services are conducted utilizing two service models: home mentoring and community-based education. Both models holistically support its mission, working in synergy to protect children and build healthy families in the community. Services are implemented to infuse the community and the families that The Family Compass serves with guidance, support, education, knowledge, and skills on parenting best practices in order to keep vulnerable children out of the child welfare system.

SIENNA’S STORY


CHILD & YOUTH EXPERIENCES

BIG THOUGHT


The mission of Big Thought is to make imagination a part of everyday learning.

Big Thought has been recognized as a national leader in arts education, juvenile justice intervention, after school programming, summer learning, and learning systems. Big Thought is currently one of six community partnerships in the US helping scale national best practices in social and emotional learning with The Wallace Foundation. At its core, Big Thought empower more than 100,000 North Texas youth to build their creative muscle, develop social and emotional skills and wellbeing, and discover and shape their authentic voice.

ZY'COREY'S STORY


CHRONIC HEALTH & DISABILITY SERVICES

THE WARREN CENTER


The mission of The Warren Center is to advocate, serve, and empower children and families in Dallas County impacted by developmental delays and disabilities.

Since inception, The Warren Center has provided therapy, resources, and education to more than 17,000 families in North Texas. It is working to ensure children with developmental disabilities reach their full potential, and ensure parents acquire resources and skills needed to build strong families.

ELIZABETH’S STORY


INTERNATIONAL

WORLD RELIEF


World Relief is a global Christian humanitarian organization that brings sustainable solutions to the world’s greatest problems. It partners with local churches and community leaders to bring hope, healing and transformation to the most vulnerable.

World Relief


MENTAL & BEHAVIORAL HEALTH

CENTER FOR DEPRESSION RESEARCH & CLINICAL CARE


UT Southwestern Medical Center's Center for Depression Research and Clinical Care is a nationally recognized center of excellence in the research and treatment of mood disorders, including depression and bipolar disorder. For more than two decades, Dr. Madhukar Trivedi and his colleagues at UT Southwestern Medical Center have conducted cutting-edge research to improve the treatment of depression, including the largest study-to-date examining appropriate treatment sequences for depression.



Center for Depression Research & Clinical Care


2019

Grant making in review


30%

of grants awarded in 2019 were for Child and Youth Experiences

22%

of dollars awarded in 2019 were for International grants

168

total grants awarded in 2019

$34.7M

dollars awarded in 2019

2019 Awarded & Paid

2019 Grants Awarded

2019 Grant Making Overview

Annual Grant Making Review

Annual Grant Making Review

Download the full 2019 Report


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